3 Object Lessons on Gratitude

Bible Object Lessons about Gratitude

What’s the one thing missing from many Christmas celebrations? Gratitude, of course! Hard as they may try, parents face real challenges instilling this virtue into their little ones. Today’s “me first” society leads kid astray. I believe God wants us to instruct our children to have a good attitude in all things. Supplement your thankfulness lessons with these three object lessons.

The rejected gift: (John 3:16) Wrap up a gift and display it as you tell this story. Say, “Pretend that you spent months finding the perfect gift for someone you love. You searched and searched until you found a gift that you’re sure your loved one will appreciate. It was an expensive gift and you had to sell everything you own to buy it. Finally, you did it. You put the gift in a box and you wrapped it up. When the right day came, you gave the gift to that person you loved. You couldn’t hardly wait! You showed them the gift, holding it out in your hands but the person you loved said, ‘No thank you.’ She wouldn’t open it, she just turned and walked away. You left feeling sad and rejected. God feels the same way when we reject His son, Jesus. God’s best gift was His son. Jesus gave his life so we could go to heaven. Will you accept God’s gift today?”

Attitude of gratitude: (2 Cor. 9:7) For this object lesson, write the word “attitude” on a dry erase board. Talk to kids about what attitude means. Slowly, erase and add the letters needed to spell “gratitude.” Tell kids that God wants them to have an attitude of gratitude. They should remember to be thankful for their blessings.

Stinky egg: (Col. 3:15) You need to think ahead for this object lesson. Put one egg in a carton and leave it out on the counter for a few days. Carefully draw a sad face on the “stinky” egg. Put a happy face on a fresh egg. Explain to the children that the stinky egg wants to be alone, doesn’t like to share and is never thankful. Crack the egg in a bowl so kids can smell the stinkiness in side. In another bowl, crack a fresh egg. Let kids see how fresh the egg looks. Ask kids to choose which kind of egg they want to be.


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