Pokémon Go: What Parents Need to Know

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Pokémon Go: What Parents Need to Know
Pokémon are everywhere….
The latest reinvention of this gaming phenomenon is going viral. It’s called Pokémon Go and it’s the biggest trend in kid culture this summer (and probably this year). In this article, I’m trying to explain the game and offer a basic guide to what parents need to know about Pokémon Go.
It’s the classic capture-train-battle imaginary animals game with a twist. This version exists on smartphones and is taking “augmented reality” mainstream. Basically, the game uses your GPS data and phone’s camera to turn the real world into a gaming environment. You have to go places, like public parks or restaurants, to make progress. For example, they designated our church parking lot is a “Pokémon stop” which helps players refill items  in the game. Here’s a video to explain more or read this or this parents guide.

My boys have been waiting, actually pestering me non-stop, to try the game. We installed it Saturday night and can already see why it’s so appealing. Almost instantly, we were catching Pokemon in our driveway. Then we walked up the street to catch a few more. Across town it showed other game features and even a battle gym. So I drove the boys over to check it out. The whole adventure was exciting and made for some fun family time.
Then on Sunday we spent some time at a local park. To my surprise, Pokémon trainers were everywhere. We ran across 50+ other people searching in the park. Some were teenagers, but many were young adults in groups without kids. The game experience didn’t show these people nearby, but the virtual game locations (a battle gym and multiple Pokémon stops) were bringing people from across the city.
Today, we played a little in our own yard and achieved a basic level promotion that unlocks more of the social features of the game. Then we tried out the battle gym feature. Basically, it’s like a digital Pokémon battle. We lost, but expect to do better with some training. To play properly, it will mean walking many miles each week.
I’m not sure what’s next, but we are proceeding with caution. I will predict this game has staying power after the buzz wears down. For kids, it may be their favorite game for some time. Don’t miss my discussion of parental concerns below. One upside, our kids don’t own smartphones so they are only going to play with me nearby.

Parents Will Have Concerns about Pokémon Go

Like the original Pokémon, this new digital version will puzzle many parents. As Time magazine report, there is much for parents to fear.  That’s true,  even with the positive storylines about kids getting outside more. Like any new fad in kids culture, Christian parents need to be wise.
Like anything that comes “from the world,” those of us within the church have different reactions. I started a conversation about this on the excellent “Children’s Pastors Only” Facebook group and most responses fall into four categories. I’m starting a poll to hear what you think.
[polldaddy poll=9470964]
 
Some Christian parents are worried the game is tied to occult symbols or otherwise a spiritual danger to kids.  That’s a matter of conscience, but a question worth asking. Several readers have responded to this post with those concerns. If that’s your case, then obviously the game is not a good fit for your family. I’m not convinced it’s spiritually dangers (we are playing as a family), but you should draw your own conclusions.

Editor’s Update: One reader shared her experience and concerns that this type of games will open children to demonic influence. That is beyond the normal way I think about demons. I tend to associate them with the serious evil acts, typically things that are defacing (or denying) the image of God in other people. Something like terrorism, child abuse, human trafficking, and related violence. So the cartoon monsters in kids game didn’t really rise to that level of danger.  I certainly don’t encourage anyone to trespass their own God-given conscience on this issue, no child’s game would be worth that.

Some have noted positive effects of this game. Kids getting exercise and going outside is a big benefit.


On the hand, we should be careful. Augmented reality gaming is new experience and clearly a safety concern. Players must play close attention to their surroundings. GPS maps could lead gamers into private property or make them less aware of car traffic. Even walking around with my kids it was hard to stay focused on the real situation with cars. This game could turn tragic if a player was attempted to drive and track down Pokémon.
Kids playing social game has always been a concern for parents. So far this game has kept us anonymous online. In the real world this game breaks down social barriers, we started several conversations with other players in the park. That was no danger while I was with my boys, but I’m not comfortable with those interactions had I not been present.
Update: 5 days later the game has continued to enable family time. My wife launched her own account and it gives us another reason to get out and walk once the kids are in bed. The main frustration has been server outage. It’s been a positive thing for our summer family routine. We’ve made a few more rules, like never looking at the phone while you’re in the road or behind the wheel. 
Others might have privacy concerns. All your GPS date and camera data are being sent back to the game servers. This opens the door for digital snooping, but no more than most apps on your phone. There was a major glitch on the early versions of this game on iPhone too, but that has been corrected according to game makers. Church Leaders has another helpful article on this new game.

My Advice for Parents

  1. Set boundaries now. With any new technology, augmented reality gaming will be coming to more games than Pokémon Go. This fad will fade away, but the new way of using smartphones + GPS will be more popular in coming years. Many parents (myself included) don’t think kids need cell phones until they are driving.
  2. Don’t violate your conscience. I want to respect parents who are worried about the spiritual side of this game. I am getting lots of email, but I still am not convinced. On the other hand, I don’t think it wise for any parents to violate their conscience. In my family we are enjoying the game, but also talking about the spiritual issues of imagination, games, and evolution – but we are having fun too. I consider it a teaching moment.
  3. Keep an open mind. Just because it’s new and silly doesn’t mean it’s demonic. I’ll be careful here because I don’t want to cause unnecessary offense. I haven’t seen a responsible theological argument against this game. I consider it an issue of conscience and Gospel liberty.  Christians have been quick to disparage technology, but slow to focus on loving others. I think this is an opportunity to connect with real humans, those who bear the image of God. I don’t want my fundamentalist background to keep me from fulfilling the second commandment.
  4. Use this for relationships. I’ve spent more time with my boys playing this game than doing much else this summer. I know that’s sad, but it’s a reality of busy lives. Like talking sports with my older kids, this is a way for us to relate and find shared interest. We make shared decisions about our shared game account and it’s bringing us closer together.
  5.  Don’t walk in the road. With any distraction, you have got to stay away from cars. We’ve decided only to play in areas where the sidewalk is wide and we can feel safe in our surroundings. This is easy in our historic and wonderfully safe small town Indiana. I don’t know how it works in other cities. We’ve also chosen (along with my boys input) not to play while the car is driving. Even if they are holding the phone, the excitement of the game could distract me while I’m behind the wheel. I’m certain there will be tragedies on the news next week from people not looking before crossing the road.

Is Pokémon Go a Ministry Opportunity?

I’ve already read something about this. Churches (as well as businesses) are thinking this could be a way to attract new people, especially kids. I don’t expect that will work out for most. There may be some ways to incorporate Pokémon into a lesson plan, it’s still just a game. Most people will move on to some other interest.
The real opportunity is making new friends. Like we experienced in the park, strangers are open to talking about this phenomenon. Here is a really interesting article about that aspect of the game. Like any other shared interest, you could connect with someone new and find a new acquaintance.  That’s a totally normal thing, with or without Pokémon Go.

What do you think about Pokémon Go?

I’d love to have some reader feedback on this game. What is your first impression? Should parents be concerned? Are you playing alongside your kids? Leave a comment below to share your opinion. It’s okay to disagree, but we’re not really a debate style blog. Please post anything you feel is helpful to other parents.


41 thoughts on “Pokémon Go: What Parents Need to Know”

  1. I just came in from a 30 minute walk around our block with my 26-year old daughter as we played our very first hunt. I cannot remember the last time we took a walk together. Worth it? Absolutely!! She enjoyd snap chatting to all of her friends to tell them she was giving me the tutorial .I just enjoyed the time with her!! Plus I will know what the kids are talking about at kids camp tomorrow????

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  2. This game is actually a huge invasion of privacy. Because you log on with your Google account it’s constantly telling their servers where you are and opens up all of your private info to them. It’s also just a perverted form of geo caching. At least in geo caching you find an actual item not just walking around staring at your phone.

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    • You are absolutely Right! People could use this for God, but they must understand why it was invented and what it is being used for. We are oblivious to spiritual warfare. By that I mean, evil uses things to keep us from God or put us in harms way. By allowing access through our email accounts right off the bat should have been the first clue. Secondly, of course you are being tracked! Or you couldn’t catch! Do people understand how evil can use that. If Hitler had access to this technology what do you think he would have accomplished? What do you think the antichrist will do with all of this info? To catch a fish you first bait them, then hook them, then reel them in. We need to pray for discernment and wisdom in these situations. I would never be flippant in regards to anything or disregard someone else’s lesson learned. Evil is tricky. That’s why it has succeeded in changing our world so successfully. Be in the world and not of it is of course how need to live, Glorifying God and spreading the Great Commission. Now since children of course are going to play this it is my firm belief that churches must be involved. Making themselves a gym or whatever is important, but with that said they need to be there when people show up to welcome them and plant the seeds God intends them to plant in regards to this situation. Remember – All things are for the Glory of God… we just need to learn how to use what evil intends for harm for good and do the work! We can’t fear and avoid or we lose before we start. I hate Facebook. I refuse to use it. I will not line a liberals pockets with billions if I can help it, nor will I by into the idea that it does “good”. I believe people rationalize why they use social media. If Christians didn’t support social media they would have struggled more and would not have had the success they did and do. Now that being said, I understand churches must be apart of this machine. And let me make it very clear, if God lays it on my heart to a mission field in one or more of these areas I WILL obey with a humble and obedient heart and mind and ears to hear Him and what He desires me to do or say or post, tweet, snap, etc. Bottom line is this – make sure all you do draws you closer to the Lord not further away.
      Love to all my brothers and sisters in Christ. Bless you all in your walk

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  3. My kids are lucky to have the Pokémon gym be their church. Rule is they go to church then battle. It is so much easier to get my teens to church without complaints.

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    • What is the church building really for? Games, especially war games? Or corporate worship of the One True GOD, house of prayer, uplifting fellowship, carrying others burdens, teaching the Word Of GOD?

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  4. Our church is on the stop for these little guys, I am going to make the most of it and offer water bottles with pokemon go and church logo w services on them and snacks all in a pokemon box just inside the always open doors of the church. We are a tourist attraction is very hot Charleston. We shall see how this goes!

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  5. No compromise for me as a mom of 2 young children and a young adult.
    It takes away their focus and things like this for me is addictive. Its still the same game that replaces anything that is more important.

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  6. This is not yet available in the UK but our youth are already very excited about it and there is a big buzz around its release, will definitely consider taking the groups for a walk around the local park with it, we have done geo caching before and they loved it I am sure this new tech version will be just as popular.

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  7. I have been giving some thought to proactive questions to ask when playing Pokemon Go (as a Christian Life Coach, it’s my job to ask questions!) This is what I’ve come up with so far:
    1. What else is going on in my day? If you have other commitments, perhaps it is not the day to play! If the family is just about to leave for an event/gathering, that answer is ‘no’!
    2. How much time am I going to spend playing? Commit before you begin how much time you will dedicate to this game. Set a timer on that very same ‘playing device’ or ask ‘Siri’ to remind you when ‘time is up’! We all know how computer games, social media and even TV watching just steal our time because we are being ‘entertained’. That takes away from productivity though and trains us for complacency.
    As you do play out in the community, ask:
    1. Where am I going? What if it leads you to an unsafe area? Be aware of your surrounds.
    2. How am I going to get there? People are DRIVING playing this game!!! It is wrong, don’t do it!
    Putting yourself and others in danger for a GAME is just plain wrong.
    3. What level of ‘busyness’ is around me? Assess the traffic, the number of people, if there are bikes, boarders around you. If you don’t watch for these things, chances of injury are going to increase.
    4. Who else is going with me? It would be safer to travel with a group of friends/family members and on a positive note, you would be spending time together!
    Tips:
    1. Designate a point person to not watch the screen at all (unless you have all stopped to peek).
    2. Train yourself (Better yet, parents: train your kids!) to keep the phone out of view while moving. Put it in your pocket or carry it by your side and ONLY look at your screen when you come to a stop.
    3. If you meet ‘Pokemon friends’ that you don’t know as you get to your location, NEVER leave with them! You may hit it off and have fun together, but bad people will use good things for their not-so-nice purposes. Be Wise.
    4. Never go out in the middle of the night! It is not safe, especially for kids. Most crime happens in the dark of night.
    The lure of this game will be very strong and will lead people to use poor judgment at times. To kids, they are just “playing” a game. But in reality, they are out in the real world potentially endangering the safety of themselves and others. However, all that said, it has great potential to bring people together in ways never thought of before. It is an example of what the 21st Century brings with it in technological advancements. It’s not a bad thing, but we must learn (and teach our kids!) to use this technology wisely.

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    • Thank you for this thoughtful post. I totally agree that we need to be wise in this. What a great opportunity to teach our kids about good choices and smarter use of technology.

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  8. I am horrified with the ignorance of christian parents and childrenworkers in churches what is going on in the spiritual world and not being able to recognise the occult influence of games such as this pokemon. It draws children away from God and gives them unknowingly acces to spiritual realms you would not like to be involved with as followers of the Living God!! This is what we are warned about over and over again by God in His Word. Why is there no good explanation on this site concerning this kind of games which originates directly out of the realms of utter darkness??? There is no excuse whatsoever. A good and worthwhile commentary is to be found on http://christiananswers.net : Pokémon- A Christian Commentary

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    • Thanks for writing. If that’s your case, then obviously the game is not a good fit for your family. I’m not convinced it’s spiritually dangers, but you should draw your own conclusions.

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    • Great remarks! Satan is blinding us and is using the kids to do it. That monster is using our children to fall in to his satanic trap. Sadly that we’re not training our kids to lead others to Christ.
      People are perishing because of lack of knowledge. You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free.

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  9. I don’t mean to be a downer, however, the name Pokemon brings back devastating memories.
    Up until 2008, my children loved Pokemon… Always received the cards and toys from me and other relatives. Pokemon was “in”.
    One of my children had a history of night terrors that not even medicine could help with. Countless nights waking up to him streaming eyes wide open yet still in his dream.
    I became a Christian in 2008 and attended a very informative life giving church.
    I had learned about how real demons are and how dangerous they can be when we open doors to them.
    Long story short…my son, during one of his night terrors, pointed to the sofa and could hardly speak because of the terror he was feeling….he named the Pokemons he saw life size on the sofa…I went to our pastor and told him what was going on and did some research on Pokemon
    I was horrified to discover the names of the Pokemons were names of ancient demons…children accross the world were summonsing these Pokemons on the playground and some had been hurt…
    I then followed instructions from my pastor and prayed the blood of Jesus around my home and over my children and bound the demons and cast them away from us.
    Since then my son never had another night terror and behavior problems my children were taking medication for…progressively left and the early on were free of medication!
    Not only is Pokemon no longer allowed in my family… Neither is Digimon or Dragonball z.
    I now am extremely watchful of what my children watch, listen to, or do.
    Demons are more real than anyone wants to admit to and they are subtle as Satan was in the garden of Eden.
    I’m not saying everyone must do what we did, but I’m just testifying to what I have seen and experienced.
    Father God says His people are destroyed because of lack of knowledge…
    Please prayerfully consider what dangers may come from Pokemon and any other games that appeal to your children.

    Reply
    • (edited response)
      Thanks for commenting. I do appreciate your perspective.
      Thanks again for commenting on the blog today. I tried to reply, but maybe didn’t say things like I wanted. I don’t want to minimize your experience and many other readers were glad to have your perspective. So, I’m sending this comment to you and updating the blog post a little tonight based on your feedback.
      When I was thinking about it later, I think it was just outside of the normal way I think about demons. I tend to associate them with the serious evil acts, typically things that are defacing (or denying) the image of God in other people. Something like terrorism, child abuse, human trafficking, and related violence. So the cartoon monsters in kids game didn’t really rise to that level of danger.
      But I am starting to understand your point and do appreciate that you were willing to comment. I think that’s how we all can all encourage each other, but talking about issues of parenting and ministry.

      Reply
      • The devil is alive and well and will use any and every tactic to lead our children away from the truth into deception. We should be on our guard, vigilant, knowing that Satan disguises himself as an angel of light to steal, kill and destroy. That’s been him mission since the Garden of Eden and will be until he is cast into the lake of fire with all his minions.
        I appreciated your insights and experiencing as I have grandchildren now and still want to stay abreast of current trends. I also value the responder’s actual experience and hope you will be true to your word in welcoming differing viewpoints.

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  10. I’m enjoying my time with my teenagers. It’s hard to have something in common all the time with 15/16 year olds!! We’ve taking numerous walks in our neighborhood and surrounding neighborhoods! I will drive my kids around they are my co-pilots and direct me to stop! My attention is on the road as where it should be.
    We are a Christian family and I do believe demons exist but in this house we know the difference between augmented reality and reality!! Some names are versions of the real name of the animal backwards! I.E. snake is ekans. We pray in this house, the blood of Jesus covers us.
    Get outside and enjoy family time.

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  11. I predict a rise in child abduction, child abuse from predators, gang rapes, robbery. … Even in your article you ran into others playing the game. I just finished an article where 3 youths were using the game to prey on innocents. A few techies in the police department figured out what was going on. Not to mention adults so fixated on their phones they have been seriously injured. Not worth it. Why do you need a third party to communicate or have a relationship with other people. This is NOT good.

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  12. Karen says i have the same co cern as lara about the safty of the environ ,the persons you come into contact with. Some people use these opportunities to do crimes.these were my first thoughts

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  13. ” he that is not with Me is against Me … he that gathereth not with Me scattereth abroad ” …
    Television – games – phones – time on the computer …
    GOOD can be the Enemy of Best …
    Jus’ sayin’ …
    Sorry not sorry … <

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  14. I do not know alot about this Pokemon fad, but I do know game is causing people to drive through our parking lot and even sit in our parking lot at the child care center I work at. This concerns me because we have already had these Pokemon players near about run into some of the parents cars dropping off and picking up their children. Plus this is also a safety issue with people we don’t know who they are sitting out in the parking lot at the center. Our playground I’d in a fenced area near the parking lot and the church that owns and operates the center is next door. We share this parking lot. I have concerns about the safety of the children I am responsible for. Sorry I don’t like seeing strangers outside the window driving through the center and parking outside the center when they don’t have a child there .

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    • Excellent point. We’ve noticed lots of strange traffic patterns that I suspect are tied to the game. I’m afraid this may be a concern that keeps growing.

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  15. Also I believe the church is always trying to use worldly attraction to draw children to God. What are we saying. Are we saying God can’t or want draw them. The truth is the Battle is in the war room. That is the prayer room. Remember what Jesus said. He told his deciplies that it came through by prayer and fasting. Not through worldly attractions and worldly means. If we aspect to win others to Jesus, it has to be on our knees. A church in Burlington NC is having hundreds to come to Jesus and more are coming. They have been in revival for 2 months straight. Check them out online at New Hope Baptist Church, Burlington,NC.com and see what God can do without Pokemon. The minister is T C Townsend. You can find them on Facebook.
    God is doing a great thing without Pokemon help . We must be careful what our eyes see, hear,and what our minds think. Believe me I know what I am talking about. I unfortunately am living it. God help me and God help us all.

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    • I totally believe what you are saying is correct. We Christians has lost our focus on the real picture which is God and worrying about early games which is an addiction thus a sin. We need to stay on the narrow path and let God take control and lead us not pokemon

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  16. I kind of feel like I should give my two cents worth.
    As a pastor, and having grown up with pokemon, I, personally, see nothing wrong with this game, that being said I do see some moments of pause for those who need it.
    A person can do some quick research and find some sketchy article about pokemon being demonic and anti-christian, and a few quick clicks later on the same website, you see that this person also hates the government, hates other people who claim to love Jesus, etc. etc.
    Please people, be WISE in what sites you’re looking at before condemning this game.
    Evolution in the game is more akin to animal puberty than it is darwinian evolution. If you believe otherwise, you’re foolishly listening to the wrong people, because they, too, have not done proper research. There’s a new form of evolution that came out a few years back in the games that allows the pokemon to evolve into a stronger form temporarily and then going back to their normal state. But to clear things up with basic illustration – Charmander evolves to Charmeleon and then to Charizard and can never change backwards. Charmander will always evolve in that pattern. Always. He cannot change to a different type. Same with people, once puberty hits, you’re done. Charizard now has a 4th evolutionary form (don’t know what it’s called, but they call it ‘mega-evolution’ and he can ‘evolve’ temporarily to this new form if he has a strong bond with his trainer and a special rock.
    Pokemon names. The root of the names are not occultish. They’re simply not. They creators did the same thing they did in North America when renaming the creatures to understandable names.
    Again, I’ll go with Charmander… Char – as in fire ‘charred.’ Mander – as in salamander. Charmander – firesalimander. Charmeleon – Char – fire – meleon, chameleon. Charizard – char – fire, izard, lizard. Not occultic. It’s pretty simple. Mr. Mime, a pokemon, looks like a mime.
    The only credible place in the game that people can really take issue with the names of pokemon are names like, “Jynx and Hypno” (there’s probably others, but these are on the top of my head).
    Because of those names, this is a matter of conscience. In Romans, Paul talks about eating meat sacrificed to idols. Idols were demonic, in a sense, too. Although they stone, wood, etc. Where as pokemon are digital/paper/stuffed. If you, by any amount feel convicted about playing the game because of those names, (or any other factually based reason) then, for you, that is a sin. But don’t put your weight on the stronger brother, as Paul makes clear. Now, Paul also says not to have the stronger ones shame the weaker ones and cause them to sin by going against their concience. So, should Christians on either side REALLY be fighting each other in this? No. Honest conversation, yes, that’s good and helpful. But let your convictions lay within yourself and between you and Jesus. The Holy Spirit will direct you otherwise.
    There are various types of attacks and types that pokemon are (fire/poison/wind/earth/fighting/electric,water, etc) and some people claim that those signs are all occultic. To that I can only simply say, have you ever even read your bible? . Like, you know, that big chunk named “Old Testament”? Those things are all in there. Even the new testament. The Bible has dragons, pokemon has dragons.
    Some of the later pokemon are deemed ‘gods’. Which again goes back to the meat sacrificed to idols thing. If you’re concerned that you or your kids are going to worship these pokemon, then there’s cause to not play. But remember, most people who are against pokemon that i’ve come across let their kids watch disney movies, or even have toys of Hercules… all which depict gods at different times. Or they let thier kids watch something like star wars, which has swearing/violence and spiritualism all through out… don’t be a hypocrite.
    Lastly, if children are playing pokemon go, the problem is the parents. This game is basically for millenials. It’s what we grew up with. Kids these days (9-13) why do they even have a cell phone – and even then, one with a data plan they can run around with BY THEMSELVES. That’s the bigger issue.
    I applaud the parents that have made it a family game, so genius. I’ll attest to the fact by simply playing Pokemon Go, I’ve lost 10 lbs in a week (with a bit of dieting) because i’m walking over 2 kilometers a day – sometimes 6 or more (works out to roughly, 1.5 – 4 miles a day).
    Should kids 9-13 years old really be that far from home, by themselves? Obviously not. Even kids in groups get left behind – parents have left their own kids places, so it’s easy for the pack to get separated.
    Likely most church’s won’t be able to utilize this game, because gym battles are short. Pokestops last 2 seconds. You could set up a Module Lure and announce you’re doing it, but likely only have 1 or 2 people show up if you’re more rural. Can’t speak for cities. So there’s no point of church’s making a big fuss about it in terms of them doing ministry. But it’s great for Christians aged 19-30 to interact with people in their community for the first time as they’re out and about. And for me as a youth pastor to connect with high school students as they’re walking around, too.
    I hope what I’ve said is deemed helpful.

    Reply
    • Great comment! You fomulated an enlightened, godly, and informed perspective that I hope many parents are able to read before they read any other potential misinformation floating out on the Internet. Thanks again for commenting, you said everything that is floating around in my head on the issue.

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    • Your source is full of miss information. Please, do some real research and come to a position based on facts.
      The ghost Pokemon in the game are actual creatures, simply labeled ghost-type.
      As in my long comment below, the abilities they use become a matter of conscience for the believer.
      Evolution in the game is not what you think.
      The fighting in the general is not what you think.
      There is some spirituality similar to that of ancient Asian beliefs, but again… meat sacrificed to idols.
      If your conscience doesn’t feel right even in the slightest, don’t play the game.
      Please, again, don’t use the source you have used as your basis. It is full of misinformation. It had SOME facts littered through out, with wrong conclusions based on misinformation. Functionally, the author you are supporting is actually leading people astray.
      Also, summoning of the Pokemon is not like witch craft and summoning demons.
      It’s more like choosing your best kicker in a shoot out for soccer. Or best reciever in football. Its a team/strategy thing.

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      • Yes…my concern. Like Disney was so innocent. Over the years….look. Pray ask Lord before taking on anything. Especially in these end times.
        Why a game fm Pagan country!? Why could it not be fm USA…. And hv a Godly factor? This opens our kids to roaming…not just exercise. Predators will love. Not being negative…. But look where is this going. Disney, Mickey to Darkside.

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  17. I wouldn’t want my children , wandering off and possibly to potentially dangerous places. Parents , should definitely make children aware of these dangers , and preferably supervise them.

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  18. Research who designed this game. I believe he was raised in a Christian home and rebelled and mocked and turned away from it…became anti Christ. The spirit realm is real…ask Jesus! We are to come out and be separate and touch not the unclean thing. Christians cannot afford to be ignorant of the spirit realm. Too many are! The devil and his demons love the attention they receive because of ignorance. Come out from the world, we are told! Any pluses in this thing are really a zero. This is a deception of the devil. I pray that the Lord opens eyes and minds to see the reality of this! Amen.

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    • The only place I’ve seen these the maker of the game grew up Christian and is rebelling are mock news sites. I’ve not seen anyone reputable do anything to prove this. Every time I ask for references of where this information came from, the source is sketchy at best, and hateful at worst. Please be sure that the people you listen to and read are full of truth and love. If the source you are quoting often tears down other Christians, the love of God is not in them which makes them a poor source.
      Also, mock news sites are also poor sources.

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    • Just because someone is not a Christian, does not mean that everything that comes from that person is evil. Do you eat fast food? Do you know if the founders and owners of said restaurants are Christians, or people who deny God? How about the toys you buy your kids…who designed those? Do they deny God? That is simply a far-fetching and futile viewpoint. There could be millions of people who were brought up Christian and denied the faith, who now have founding roots in ANYTHING you buy. This is just another mindless time waster, at worst. Dangerous people are everywhere and use every gaming/internet avenue to fulfill their evils. Yes, they can use this, too. Like everything in life, one must exercise their own cautions and consciences.

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